2406.1 Human impact loads. Individual glazed areas,
including glass mirrors, in hazardous locations as defined in
Section 2406.4 shall comply with Sections 2406.1.1 through
2406.1.4.
Exception: Mirrors and other glass panels mounted or
hung on a surface that provides a continuous backing support.
2406.1.1 Impact test. Except as provided in Sections
2406.1.2 through 2406.1.4, all glazing shall pass the
impact test requirements of Section 2406.2.
2406.1.2 Plastic glazing. Plastic glazing shall meet the
weathering requirements of ANSI Z97.1.
2406.1.3 Glass block. Glass-block walls shall comply
with Section 2101.2.5.
2406.1.4 Louvered windows and jalousies. Louvered



Mirrored glass glued to a bathtub surround is exempt from the impact test. That doesn't mean it is invisible to the rest of section 2406 safety glazing.


2406.4 Hazardous locations. The locations specified in Sections 2406.4.1 through 2406.4.7
shall be considered specific hazardous locations requiring safety glazing materials.

2406.4.5 Glazing and wet surfaces. Glazing in walls,
enclosures or fences containing or facing hot tubs, spas,
whirlpools, saunas, steam rooms, bathtubs, showers and
indoor or outdoor swimming pools where the bottom
exposed edge of the glazing is less than 60 inches (1524
mm) measured vertically above any standing or walking
surface shall be considered a hazardous location. This shall
apply to single glazing and all panes in multiple glazing.
Exception: Glazing that is more than 60 inches (1524
mm), measured horizontally and in a straight line, from
the water’s edge of a bathtub, hot tub, spa, whirlpool, or
swimming pool.


It is still required to be safety glazing.

The code section is misleading. Where many sections start with a charging statement, 2604 has an exemption for glass mirrors that have backing. No impact test is required. So where we should find a charging statement that would naturally include any exceptions some are set on a path to exempt mirrors that have backing. Those mirrors must still be safety glazing.

The code section should lead off with 2406.4


Everything above was from the Building code and this is residential code.

R308.4.5 Glazing and wet surfaces. Glazing in walls,
enclosures or fences containing or facing hot tubs, spas,
whirlpools, saunas, steam rooms, bathtubs, showers and
indoor or outdoor swimming pools where the bottom
exposed edge of the glazing is less than 60 inches (1524
mm) measured vertically above any standing or walking
surface shall be considered a hazardous location. This shall
apply to single glazing and all panes in multiple glazing.
Exception: Glazing that is more than 60 inches (1524
mm), measured horizontally and in a straight line, from
the water’s edge of a bathtub, hot tub, spa, whirlpool, or
swimming pool.


If there is less than 60" from a wall that faces a shower or tub, any glazing will be safety glazing.

There is an exception here as well.  Take note that the exception does not apply to showers.



There's a piece of vinyl stuck on the end.

Here's the thing with that block. When it is taken out the window will open further but it will not stay open that far unless you hold it open. If you are trying to crawl out of the window you're not going to hold it open. You will have 21" no matter what.       

On this job, I was filling in for another inspector. The inspection request was for drywall and lath. The bedroom windows open 21" high. There is a 3.5" plastic stop at the top that can be removed which will allow the window to open 24". Flipper was there and he removed the blocks and shoved the window wide open.

Bent nails did the trick.  I guess all the holes in the flashing are insignificant.

TIGERLOOSE

Then there was a load sound and this metal didn't retract with the window.

The contractor insisted that drywall screws are okay. He told me that he has used drywall screws on windows for years without a hitch in his giddy up. I believed him.... because he seems like an honest guy...but mostly because this is his residence. He missed a safety glazing requirement next to the front door.....Been getting that wrong for years too.

They had just reached their stride when they hit the wall.

Helluva place for a window. Tempered or not it has got to go. I could show you scars from tempered glass.       

406.3 Replacement window emergency escape and rescue openings. Where windows are required to provide emergency escape and rescue openings in Group R-2 and R-3 occupancies, replacement windows shall be exempt from the requirements of Sections 1030.2, 1030.3 and 1030.5 provided the replacement window meets the following conditions: 


The replacement window is the manufacturer’s largest standard size window that will fit within the existing frame or existing rough opening. The replacement window shall be permitted to be of the same operating style as the existing window or a style that provides for an equal or greater window opening area than the existing window. 
The replacement of the window is not part of a change of occupancy. 

The following is the code that has been exempted:
1030.2Minimum size. Emergency escape and rescue openings shall have a minimum net clear opening of 5.7 square feet (0.53 m2). 
Exception: The minimum net clear opening for grade- floor emergency escape and rescue openings shall be 5 square feet (0.46 m2). 

1030.2.1 Minimum dimensions. The minimum net clear opening height dimension shall be 24 inches (610 mm). The minimum net clear opening width dimension shall be 20 inches (508 mm). The net clear opening dimensions shall be the result of normal operation of the opening. 

1030.3 Maximum height from floor. Emergency escape and rescue openings shall have the bottom of the clear opening not greater than 44 inches (1118 mm) measured from the floor.

1030.5Window wells. An emergency escape and rescue opening with a finished sill height below the adjacent ground level shall be provided with a window well in accordance with Sections 1030.5.1 and 1030.5.2.

Now to examine the code that does apply:

406.3 states thatreplacement windows shall be exempt from the requirements of Sections 1030.2, 1030.3 and 1030.5 . That is provided:
The replacement window is the manufacturer’s largest standard size window that will fit within the existing frame or existing rough opening.
The replacement window shall be permitted to be of the same operating style as the existing window or a style that provides for an equal or greater window opening area than the existing window. 

The first part states that the window must be the largest that that particular manufacturer sells which will fit the opening. Since there is an opening and it is filled to the brim with window, anyone can surmise that the next size up isn't going to fit. That will usually be obvious but if an inspector is to know that, I suppose research is required. Note that there is no description of the window.

It must pass the first part and now there is a choice. One of the next two shall be met.....do that and the question is answered.

Next is that the window can be of the same operating style. That is simple to discern. What is not included is any indication that there are any restraints on the net free opening area. The only requirement is that it be of the same operating style.....the window will slide one of two ways...horizontal or vertical...maybe swing out..... that's all there is to it.

The other path to approval is a style that provides an equal or better opening area as the existing window. Now any style is granted as long as the area meets this requirement.....which is only the area of the opening.....not minimum opening dimensions. Not height from the floor. Just the area. Can it be a group of openings? As is the next part of this thread.



The previous window was a horizontal slider. A fixed pane in the middle and sliding panes of equal dimension on either side. The whole thing is a bit over 60". The actual opening area is unknown but the individual openings were undoubtedly small in comparison to the present-day egress code. The sill height is 49".

A. The new window has an opening nearing a half in each of three segments. The previous window did the same in two of the three segments. Obviously this window produces more "opening area" than the existing window.

B. Another way to look at this is to define "opening area" as a single opening and not a group. Rather than accepting a greater number of areas as contributing to the whole opening in the window. In this case the window above still meets the code in that half of a 1/3 segment opened before and does so now.

B makes better sense than A....But consider that if the window is the same "operating style" any opening is possible. Should there be an expansion on the word style? Perhaps include, "Well then it's going to open just as big as the existing". I don't see that fitting in with style or this code which clearly exempts the egress requirements.
Nothing is implied by the code. Style in the parlance of construction is hung and slider.

Some claim that style means like for like. The same operating style with the same net free opening with the same or greater width and height dimensions. The sill height would remain the same or be lower. The thinking is that the replacement window is no less compliant than was the existing window.
We took that approach some years ago. There was a problem with many retrofit windows that reduced the opening area and raised the sill height. That problem has gone away with 406.3.

If it is like for like it would have been easy enough to just say so. The wording, "operating style" is a limitation. It does not include any other parameter. If the previous use of the word style included like for like there would be no use in stating that the other style is "a style that provides for an equal or greater window opening area than the existing window." 

It all seems at odds with what we do when applying code to egress windows. Something went wrong here. Can compliant egress windows be replaced with windows that are exempt from egress requirements?

If nothing else, this code is poorly written.
 

I posted this picture at an inspectors' forum.  Nobody agreed that I could legally make them move this window:


fw. said:
I understand that it's a hazardous location; my question is why he won't allow tempered glass?


When the window is broken the glass will shatter into small pieces. Most of it will fall out of the frame. The perimeter gasket will hold a rim of jagged glass. So I can envision an arm or leg stuck through the window frame and being cut by that ring of tempered glass that didn't fall out of the frame.

Well you say, "That is always the case"..... And you are correct and yet I allow tempered glazing in most locations. In fact all locations up until now. This just looks like a horrible accident waiting to happen.

Not everything is addressed by a code.   So I illegally made them move the window.    

That's an imprint from an owl that slammed into the window.